drugstore-cowboy-LO

2014 • 52.75″ x 19.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Everyone has come to calling the full frontal male figures as the “penis paintings.” In 2014 I decided to incorporate a little Texas imagery i.e. cowboys, into the series. Of course I’m not one to explore a topic at just face value.

I’ve seen many people who look like cowboys in Texas, but I’m not sure if any of them actually were. I imagine my path doesn’t cross that of a real working cowboy very often, but I have seen plenty of Texas zealots who fancy themselves, and every cartoonishly macho actor who ever set foot in Texas, as a cowboy.
Wiki.Answers.com says:

Read more

2014 • 52.75″ x 19.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Everyone has come to calling the full frontal male figures as the “penis paintings.” In 2014 I decided to incorporate a little Texas imagery i.e. cowboys, into the series. Of course I’m not one to explore a topic at just face value.

Here we see my rodeo clown, for example, with his prop gun, holding a target but somehow managing to shoot himself in the foot. Wikipedia says about Rodeo Clowns:

Read more

2014 • 52.75″ x 19.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Everyone has come to calling the full frontal male figures as the “penis paintings.” In 2012 I decided to incorporate a little Texas imagery i.e. cowboys, into the series. Of course I’m not one to explore a topic at just face value.

I’ve seen many people who look like cowboys in Texas, but I’m not sure if any of them actually were. I imagine my path doesn’t cross that of a real working cowboy very often, but I have been to Austin and have undoubtedly come across plenty of real live hipsters. This piece combines imagery of the hipster with ironic facial hair, tight snap-up western shirt, and redneck beer with the Texas saying of “all hat and no cattle.”

Read more

2014 • 54.75″ x 31″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

The whole idea behind the concept of making paintings that highlight our use of food and the celebrations they’re tied to as a distraction to our existential angst came from a comment I made about art shows being essentially a “self doubt and cheese cubes” scene. So as I continue this series it is only fitting that I name my solo shows the same way.

Read more

2014 • 31.25″ x 55.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Schadenfreude is a German expression meaning “to take pleasure in the misfortune of others.” You see three characters:

  • The hapless victim who is too caught up in feeling sorry for himself to fix the situation
  • The jerk who is satisfied and amused by the greater status he was able, with no effort of his own, to achieved relative to that of his friend
  • The opportunistic ram who takes advantage while the others are distracted
Read more

2014 • 17.5″ x 36.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

There was once going to be a “gamer” themed group show at a relatively well known gallery in San Antonio. I was creating this when I found out it was going to be moved to a grungy independent coffee shop/art studio/gallery in an “emerging neighborhood”. I bowed out, not wanting to do group shows in coffee shops at this point in my career.

Still, I was stuck with this piece, a bit of a departure from my usual work. I like it though. Any GenXer like me can relate to the feeling of bruised thumbnails from pounding that old school Nintendo controller too hard, for too long.

Read more

My 2014 Houston show is home again in San Antonio. What’s left of it. I sold a few. Meh, I’ll take it. I hear there was a buzz about it from other artists and people from Houston and others who were visiting got a big kick out of it too.

As for press, I got mentions in the usual blogs and bulletin boards but I got a nice write up in the Houston Press. Gus Kopriva, owner Redbud, the gallery hosting my show, was even surprised at the attention. He says his shows don’t get that much play. I must have really caught there eye.

Read more

2014 • 34″ x 17.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Before coming to the San Antonio, I hadn’t known of the German culture here and in the Hill Country, much less the mixture of Texan, Mexican and German that I understand is part of what is loosely referred to as Tejano. Being of German decent, I fixated mostly on the polka beat and accordion heard in the folk music of this area, reflecting the 19th century German influence in this part of Texas.

Read more

2014 • 34″ x 17.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Before coming to the San Antonio, I hadn’t known of the German culture here and in the Hill Country, much less the mixture of Texan, Mexican and German that I understand is part of what is loosely referred to as Tejano. Being of German decent, I fixated mostly on the polka beat and accordion heard in the folk music of this area, reflecting the 19th century German influence in this part of Texas.

Read more

2014 • 34″ x 17.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Before coming to the San Antonio, I hadn’t known of the German culture here and in the Hill Country, much less the mixture of Texan, Mexican and German that I understand is part of what is loosely referred to as Tejano. Being of German decent, I fixated mostly on the polka beat and accordion heard in the folk music of this area reflecting the 19th century German influence in this part of Texas.

Read more

2014 • 46.75″ x 17.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

(After the portrait of Jonathan Buttall by Thomas Gainsborough)

I loved the way the paintings and sculptures of the boy in the blue suit and the girl in the pink dress had a pop culture name of “Blue Boy” and “Pinkie.” We all remember seeing them in the beds and baths of our friends’ mothers, but none of us remember them having any impression other than an un-articulated feeling about their mothers’ bad taste. Later, when I found out everyone had similar experiences, it was great fun. I always wonder though…who among the people I meet today are the children of such women, or do they themselves have representations of these long dead children in their master bedrooms?

Read more
WorldCitizen_LO

2014 • 46.75″ x 17.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

(After the portrait of Sarah Barrett Moulton by Thomas Lawrence)

I loved the way the paintings and sculptures of the boy in the blue suit and the girl in the pink dress had a pop culture name of “Blue Boy” and “Pinkie.” We all remember seeing them in the beds and baths of our friends’ mothers, but none of us remember them having any impression other than an un-articulated feeling about their mothers’ bad taste. Later, when I found out everyone had similar experiences, it was great fun. I always wonder though…who among the people I meet today are the children of such women, or do they themselves have representations of these long dead children in their master bedrooms?

Read more

2014 • 15.75″ x 33.25″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

We’ve all been there. We realized as it happened the gateway those railroad crossings can be from one reality into another. Which side is right and which side is wrong is rather relative though.

This is from a series created from imagery derived solely from pictographs found in my collection of wingding and dingbat computer fonts.

Starting from a large selection of these symbols and shapes I made associations and pairings to match preconceived ideas or allowing them to inspire their own themes.

Read more

2014 • 15.25″ x 29″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

I was going to make a piece for a group show for refugee relief with the theme being depictions of refugee children, citizens of the world. I assembled the component pieces into an illustration of suffering brown children living someplace hot, making for compelling television entertainment.

This is from a series created from imagery derived solely from pictographs found in my collection of wingding and dingbat computer fonts.

Starting from a large selection of these symbols and shapes I made associations and pairings to match preconceived ideas or allowing them to inspire their own themes.

Read more

2014 • 15.25″ x 29″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

The iconic first line of the even more iconic novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Louisville’s own, Hunter S. Thompson. It marks the time when the “drugs began to take hold” on a journey from LA to Las Vegas in a rented convertible.

This is from a series created from imagery derived solely from pictographs found in my collection of wingding and dingbat computer fonts.

Starting from a large selection of these symbols and shapes I made associations and pairings to match preconceived ideas or allowing them to inspire their own themes.

Read more

2014 • 19.25″ x 25.75″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Meant as a foil to the “Free Range Chicken” piece this painting highlights how odd it is to picture our food as an industrial product rather than one made with love in a kitchen by a grandmotherly figure.

This is from a series created from imagery derived solely from pictographs found in my collection of wingding and dingbat computer fonts.

Starting from a large selection of these symbols and shapes I made associations and pairings to match preconceived ideas or allowing them to inspire their own themes.

Read more

2014 • 19.25″ x 28″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

There are urban chickens and their country cousins the free rangers. There must be some yuppie chickens out there too making a life in the suburbs too. I can’t imagine closely packed houses on postage stamp lots segmented off by warped, sun bleached privacy fences being home to chickens. The constant barking of the pit bulls next door would seem to really hurt egg production and the judgmental Christians, worrying more about their property value than their immortal souls, would surely be shooting daggers from their eyes. But this is happening, I hear. Whatever.

Read more

2014 • 19.25″ x 30″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Liberals, if they eat meat at all, LOVE them some free ranging chicken. It isn’t just food, it’s a metaphor…and VERY likely to sell.

This is from a series created from imagery derived solely from pictographs found in my collection of wingding and dingbat computer fonts.

Starting from a large selection of these symbols and shapes I made associations and pairings to match preconceived ideas or allowing them to inspire their own themes.

Read more

2014 • 19.25″ x 25.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

I don’t know if it is another hipster trend of if raising chickens in the city limits is a post postmodern return to tradition of when people had a little control over their food supply. Maybe some of us will be better prepared for the collapse of civilization than others. Maybe I’ll get hungry and eat them AND their chickens.

This is from a series created from imagery derived solely from pictographs found in my collection of wingding and dingbat computer fonts.

Read more

2014 • 15.5″ x 33″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

The American dream…to willingly live your entire adult life as a debt starved wage slave to the banks in a cracker box, cookie cutter, vinyl clad house in a soulless manufactured “community” of identical structures occupied by racially and economically like-minded individuals of similar political persuasions.

This is from a series created from imagery derived solely from pictographs found in my collection of wingding and dingbat computer fonts.

Starting from a large selection of these symbols and shapes I made associations and pairings to match preconceived ideas or allowing them to inspire their own themes.

Read more

2014 • 19.5″ x 35″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Many of America’s cities were built with a light rail system in place. 50 years later tracks were paved over for buses. Now we cities looking to light rail to rejuvenate their downtowns that died when everyone bought a car, hit the interstate and drove to the suburbs.

This is from a series created from imagery derived solely from pictographs found in my collection of wingding and dingbat computer fonts.

Starting from a large selection of these symbols and shapes I made associations and pairings to match preconceived ideas or allowing them to inspire their own themes.

Read more

LOLZ

2014 • 30.25″ x 11.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Not just LOL…Multiple LOL’s! A couple against a cityscape looking up and presumably reacting to a shocking image in the sky. The acronym a nod to the computery origin of the images themselves. Are they laughing at the celestial jokester or they being told to?

This is from a series created from imagery derived solely from pictographs found in my collection of wingding and dingbat computer fonts.

Starting from a large selection of these symbols and shapes I made associations and pairings to match preconceived ideas or allowing them to inspire their own themes.

Read more

FUBAR

2014 • 30.25″ x 11.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Fucked up beyond all recognition! Who better to say this than the much maligned accordion player? A couple against a cityscape looking up and presumably reacting to a shocking image in the sky. The acronym a nod to the computery origin of the images themselves.

This is from a series created from imagery derived solely from pictographs found in my collection of wingding and dingbat computer fonts.

Starting from a large selection of these symbols and shapes I made associations and pairings to match preconceived ideas or allowing them to inspire their own themes.

Read more

STFU

2014 • 30.25″ x 11.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Shut the fuck up! Who better to say this than the much maligned accordion player? A couple against a cityscape looking up and presumably reacting to a shocking image in the sky. The acronym a nod to the computery origin of the images themselves.

This is from a series created from imagery derived solely from pictographs found in my collection of wingding and dingbat computer fonts.

Starting from a large selection of these symbols and shapes I made associations and pairings to match preconceived ideas or allowing them to inspire their own themes.

Read more

Looking good already. By Sunday, the title piece for my Houston show in June will be bumping.

20140312-195533.jpg

Read more

2013 • 58.5″ x 42″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

The basic idea for this painting came from my Dad’s old quote about the nonsense people put up on television to distract us, “They’re just trying to sell soap.”

I wanted though to combine an individual’s state of mind with the reality of of the situation that I do in many of my works. When we consume the “news” we are giving ourselves over to “guilty diversions” but what they’re doing is offering up entertainment as a vehicle for the ad impressions upon which the business model is built.

Read more

2013 • 42″ x 51″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

It is often said that people with subversive ideas are more fun than those trying to maintain the status quo. Others, whose meritless influence may be waning, long for yesteryear, bemoaning the decline of morality in America, blinded to all the social injustices and high crime rates of the “good old days.”

This imagined decline in morals often coincides with the decline in power and influence of those on top of the plutocracy. “Decline of the Bourgeois” satirizes the notion that subversive cultural influences can lead us on a path of destruction when in reality it seems the most controversial subject matter keeps the zeitgeist trending toward greater empathy and acceptance.

Read more

2013 • 48″ x 18″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

Throughout art history, seasonal themes have evoked not only death and resurrection and pagan imagery of classical antiquity that have continued to be a part of our seasonal holidays today. I this version, I have added some personal associations born of a neighbor who welcomed spring weather with a bare hairy torso, wandering the sidewalks with a highball in his hand.

Subjective associations are highlighted as well by the rubber spring symbols at his feet.

Read more

2013 • 48″ x 18″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

This piece equates the pretentiousness, hypocrisy, collective denial, and hollow ostentatiousness satirized in the Hans Christian Andersen’s “Emperor’s New Clothes” with the phenomena of “speaking in tongues” in Christian churches. Like the townsfolk in the tale, believers play along with the pretense not wanting to appear unfit for their positions or stupid.

Wikipedia offered some insight into the satire of the classic story:

Read more

2013 • 33″ x 42.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

This is a second attempt at portraying the Buddha bottling up the extremes of good and evil, maintaining The Middle Way:

The Middle Way…implies a balanced approach to life and the regulation of one’s impulses and behavior, close to Aristotle’s idea of the “golden mean” whereby “every virtue is a mean between two extremes, each of which is a vice.”

I added alliteration and food reference to make it even more fun. Incorporating the pepper imagery with the Buddha allow me to make this piece look like a product label or old sign graphic. Medium strength peppers reference the spicing up life with just a little kick but not enough to make your scalp sweat.

Read more

2013 • 60″ x 33″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

When tragedy happens, why do we find so many people thanking God that it wasn’t any worse? All of the credit – none of the blame? Good work if you can get it.

I’m not questioning God’s will, his power or even his existence with this piece. I’m questioning the egotistical belief that we have a gift giving invisible sky daddy and the shithead externalization of all blame towards the boogeymen from which He protects us. I may be comforting to a child to put a face on all the scary things that we can’t understand or control, but how can any adult settle for what is little different from the ignorant imaginings of scared cavemen explaining away the thunder.

Read more

2013 • 55″ x 33″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

I have long had issues with to Chick-fil-a. First because in the early days, it was only available in malls, and fuck going to malls. Then I found out that they were not open on Sunday. Sunday is just an arbitrarily chosen day that is different than the day the Jews observed. Why even bother? Fuck them. They would have me not able to buy chicken on Sunday exactly as I can’t buy liquor. Only later did all that anti-gay legislation stuff come out. That was just the icing on the cake and not even the subject of this piece specifically.

Read more

2011     •     33″ x 40″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

Bathtub Mary, also known as Mary on the half shell is a simulated lawn grotto framing a small statue of the Virgin Mary and less often, other Roman Catholic figures.

Wikipedia explains:

While often constructed by upending an old bathtub and burying one end, similar designs have been factory produced.

Bathtub Madonnas are also a common sight in north-central Kentucky and southern Indiana [where I spent a vast majority of my years on earth]…an area that has historically been predominately Catholic. A drive down country roads…will provide ample sightings of these small shrines.

Read more

2013 • 53″ x 35.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

I made this for a show celebrating the release of that awful new Wizard of Oz movie in the spring of 2013.

I love starting with a theme. In this case I researched the meanings and symbols in the original movie and the books it was based off of. Very much an allegory for the plight of farmers and factory workers, I starting thinking about all the reforms and subsidies that were put in place to ease the uncertainty of markets for Americas farmers and how over time they have been taken advantage of my larger and larger corporate factory farms.

Read more

Deadlines are great. They make me more productive than any creative itch possibly can. The trouble is that getting into a rush prevents me from stopping to really look at a piece as the idea is developed and guide it toward a more pleasing conclusion. The good news is that you now have a work that can be revisited and edited and made anew for the next show.

This is what I’m currently doing with “Our Lady of the Lawn” completed back in February 2013 for a show I had 3 weeks to prepare for.

Lady_of_the_lawn_SMALL

Read more

Why are there no hymns of blame? Why do we here people thanking him for the happy accidents and praying for his help during avoidable disasters?

I’m not faulting anyone’s need for meaning. I’m not begrudging anyone for wanting there to be a plan behind the workings of the cold random uncaring universe, but just imagine to be able to drop a devil wherever there is death and an angel wherever there is life. It’s a good gig if you can get it.

Read more

2013 • 28″ x 38″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

Wikipedia told me:

Red Riding Hood has also been seen as a parable of sexual maturity. In this interpretation, the red cloak symbolizes the blood of menstruation,[27] braving the “dark forest” of womanhood…the wolf threatens the girl’s virginity. The anthropomorphic wolf symbolizes a man, who could be a lover, seducer or sexual predator.

Now all of this talk is rather Freudian, but we all know Freud said that “sometimes a cigar is just a cigar”…probably because he liked to smoke them. Now if the wolf is dragging the girl into womanhood and the woodsman is reaping the benefits, then they both have an interest in her “taking up smoking.”

Read more

2013 • 45″ x 31.5″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

As humans, we mask our existential angst and despair with any number of diversions and pleasurable sensory experiences…foremost among these is melted processed cheese product. This housewife’s acrimony can’t be masked as she readies to light another cigarette (a great way to hasten the death we all fear) after extinguishing the last in the party food, boldly giving a literal and figurative “Fuck You!” to whomever doesn’t like it.

Read more

20121220-153700.jpgMy “elevator speech.” for this series has been lacking, I recently realized. People see the food, they see the ubiquitous devil and angel, the distressed individual, and they ask, “What does it mean?” I’m not interested in applying secret meanings postmortem, but I have thought more about how this idea was hatched and what it was about it that I found compelling.

I, as the artist, try to avoid decoding exactly the associations my brain pieces together. I don’t want to hinder creativity, inhibit visual expression, and decrease my production by having to craft everything I do into a finely honed allegory. I want unconscious associations to live, grow and evolve into surprisingly complex and rich juxtapositions that “synergize” into deeper truths. In other words I don’t sweat it. If it amuses me, I paint it.

Read more

2012 • 32″ x 15″ x 15″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on wood

I was asked to submit work to a functional art show in Houston in November, 2012. I had never done any such thing. I’m not big on “surface decorating” so it was a big creative exercise for me to make my type of art work on a random “functional object.”

A trip to one of many local Goodwill stores had me dragging home any wooden thing with a flat surface that would take paint. I found this basic wooden chair and figured the seat would be a great place to try out the latest in my “Paisley Muertos” series…since I’ve sold out of all the older ones.

Read more

2012 • 3.5″ x 15.5″ x 3.5″
acrylic, spray paint, mirror on wood

I was asked to submit work to a functional art show in Houston in November, 2012. I had never done any such thing. I’m not big on “surface decorating” so it was a big creative exercise for me to make my type of art work on a random “functional object.”

A trip to one of many local Goodwill stores had me dragging home any wooden thing with a flat surface that would take paint. I found this $10 chunk of walnut into which 7 holes were cut to hold candles. I meditated and wikipedia’ed on the number 7 for a while, thinking of how to incorporate its significance into the piece somehow.

Read more

“When Two Tribes Meet” was the latest of Hebron Chism’s yearly Collaboration shows.

The exhibit explored collaborations across mediums, cultures, and genders. In this edition they blended the visual arts of painting and sculpture with the literary arts of poetry and spoken word.

I was asked to participate and not only jumped at the chance to collaborate for the first time with Hebron and other artists, but I asked my new slam poet friend Anthony the Poet to write a poem about the latest in my Sedimentary Series. I made this one bigger so it could stand out more as he performed in front of it.

Read more

You have to plan, anticipate and ask questions, especially if you don’t get to see the space before arriving to set up. I had the chance to take some art to New Orleans recently. It was something I have been wanting to do for years. The issue was that it was one night only, in a bar, and I had no idea what to expect.

I started with lots of questions with the organizer. Poor young lady. Just a senior at Tulane, she was used to other young folks who were inexperienced and just happy to have a space to show their college portfolios…not a surly, 40 year-old, stressed out stranger from San Antonio who was questioning everything.

Read more

I have begun working on this new work. “Ennui Au Jus.”

We’ve all heard about combining food with other pleasurable sensory experiences like cheese and art shows, prime rib and strippers, sex and pastrami, so why not combine delicious food with a debilitating existential crisis?

“Nothing in the world is quite so awful as boredom…I’m talking about finding life itself not only uninteresting but also purposeless. Existential boredom defines an inability to find not just particular things but all of life interesting. It manifests itself as a mood in which, for no reason you can articulate, nothing seems to satisfy—even things that normally do.” – Alex Lickerman, M.D.


Read more

2012 • 42″ x 24.75″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

This was created for submission to the 2012 Huevos Rancheros jurored silent art auction. I had a while back found and noted a great(?) morning after, hair of the dog type drink: egg whites and absinthe. The idea was to use eggs in a vintage graphic sign type design on old fence pickets, incorporating themes from those wonderful Victorian absinthe lithograph posters.

Read more

2012 • 52.5″ x 35″
acrylic, spray paint on used fence pickets

We’ve all heard about combining food with other pleasurable sensory experiences like cheese and art shows, prime rib and strippers, sex and pastrami, so why not combine delicious food with a debilitating existential crisis?

Self doubt and sauerkraut obviously came together because of the rhyme, but the feelings of doubt that could be induced by the sight and odor of the strange and exotic are what is highlighted in this piece. The cautious angel is repulsed, the devil is ready to try anything, and the cat in the lederhosen is caught between belief and disbelief. Uncertainty, distrust, lack of sureness petrify him.

Read more

2012     •     48″ x 18″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

Read more

2012 • 46.5″ x 27.5″
acrylic, spray paint on recycled fence pickets

We’ve all heard about combining food with other pleasurable sensory experiences like cheese and art shows, prime rib and strippers, sex and pastrami, well we also combine delicious food with our debilitating existential crises.

I found a picture of the most bored person I could, put a chef’s hat on him and was off and running. Like Sauerkraut and Absinthe before it, this piece tries to be flat and graphic and distressed hearkening back to the days sings were hand painted on whatever wood could be found.

Read more

2012 • 48″ x 18″
acrylic, spray paint on recycled fence pickets

From dear ol’ Wikipedia

Circumcision is arguably the world’s oldest planned surgical procedure, hypothesized to be over 15,000 years old, well pre-dating recorded history. There is no firm consensus as to how it came to be practiced worldwide. Peter Charles Remondino suggested that it began as a diminishment of full castration of a captured enemy: castration certainly would have been fatal, while some form of circumcision would permanently mark the defeated, yet leave him alive to serve as a slave.

So we see, the slave mentality of blindly mutilating your son’s sex organ because of some ancient religious dogma, is indeed, still, the diminished castration or marking of a slave.

Read more
2012 Huevos Rancheros Mural

2012 Huevos Rancheros Quinceañera Celebration Silent Art Auction

Not enough. Never enough.

I did print out submission forms for the 2012 Huevos Rancheros Quinceañera Celebration Silent Art Auction and started piecing together some ideas.

First thought was that a new piece would be something in the thread of my recently begun Existential Dinner Party series…with eggs of course. “Deviled Eggs and Despair?

But then I notices something long forgotten in my idea file…”A Breakfast of Eggs and Absinthe”.

Read more

We’ve all heard about combining food with other pleasurable sensory experiences like cheese and art shows, prime rib and strippers, sex and pastrami, so why not combine delicious food with a debilitating existential crisis? Can’t recall how or why this pairing came up in an electronic conversation but it did. I’ve had “acrimony and cheese” in my idea box for a while so maybe it just took seed.

Read more

2012 • 36″ x 36″
acrylic, spray paint, silk on panel

This is a commissioned piece painted for a collector who enjoyed paisley silks and the casting of Jungian projections of witch and virgin upon a woman at different times for the same reasons. She was looking for an ironic virgin. I think the source of virgin birth myths is itself ironic:

Read more

Food, Medicine, Supplies and Freedom

"Food, Medicine, Supplies and Freedom" by Javier Aros

Read more

2012     •     48″ x 18″
acrylic, spray paint, paper on panel

“The burlesque existentialist is a stock character of the popular imagination, dressed in black and uttering gnomic assertions about life and the universe.” This quote, found on Temples of Reason, combined with my own notion of “sad clown” goths, standing around being miserable, reciting nihilistic aphorisms, lead to this painting.

The clown, sad serious and silly looking, stands on a short shallow stage that only highlights the ridiculousness of his attention starved misery. Painted on a collaged ground of old etchings, it creates an atmosphere around him that accentuates his mood.

Read more

Since buying the desert camouflage fabric and coming up with the idea for “Apologist Accepted” (right), I’ve been interested in the logical absurdity of the Young Earth creationist knuckleheads. Ignoring the fact that it is evidence-based fact derived from observations and experiments in multiple scientific disciplines that the universe has existed for around 13 billion years, that the Earth was formed about 4.5 billion years ago with life first appearing at least 2.5 billion years ago, they cling to literal interpretations of some bronze age creation myth. The apologists’ blaming fossil evidence on the Devil’s trickery are a source of great amusement as a cynic and consternation as a Humanist.

Read more

The maddening quiet before battle, toeing the edge of a cold pool, the first plodding steps of a 5 mile run, the first 100 miles of a 10 hour drive, the first few inches up a tall mountain…All unpleasant reluctant times where someone might hesitate and try to avoid the toil and trouble, to willingly give up the rewards of a struggle so they may bypass any unpleasantness or discomfort.

Read more

This started with an invitation to make a piece or two for a New Orleans themed fundraiser at The Louisville Visual Arts Association (LVAA) Water Tower.



The idea put a man draped on a Riverwalk park bench like he’s been crucified, sleeping off the Marti Gras fun early into the next morning. An angel prays a devil nurses hang over above his head, each with beads AND ashes smudged on their heads. At his feet aren’t the same lamenting saints Jesus often is seen with. Instead, he is flanked by two fellow partiers sleeping off their binges.

Read more

Can’t loose hard fought momentum and settle back into non-production. Artistic inertia works both ways, body making art tends to stay making art, body not making art tends to stay not making art…BUT…this is only the case in a vacuum. Unless constant force is applied a body making art will succumb to friction and slowly come to rest again as a body not making art. THEN to get going again one has to fight both the inertia AND friction to get going again.

    Tips to try:

  • Go big. Really big.
  • Study an art discipline completely different from painting to get my brain working with new thought patterns.
Read more

2011     •     48″ x 18″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

How is it that patriotic American zealots who get upset at burning flags WEAR so many flags themselves?

The United States Flag Code establishes advisory rules for display and care of the flag of the United States. It is Chapter 1 of Title 4 of the United States Code (4 U.S.C. § 1 et seq). This is a U.S. federal law, but there is no penalty for failure to comply with it. In fact, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that punitive enforcement would conflict with the First Amendment right to freedom of speech. – Wikipedia

Read more

2011     •     48″ x 18″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

St. Francis called the body ‘brother ass’. He kept this brother ass under perfect discipline and control. Sometimes he kept this brother ass without food and water and denied it some special food that it liked very much.”

“A cilice was originally a garment or undergarment made of coarse cloth or animal hair (a hairshirt) worn close to the skin. It was used in some religious traditions to induce discomfort or pain as a sign of repentance and atonement.”

Read more

2011     •     20″ x 12″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

What happens when we dress up the lesser of two evils with the trappings of goodness? Nothing. It is still essentially evil and it makes the angels sad.
Read more

2011     •     36″ x 24″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

The coy young woman with her good and bad conscience on her shoulders pretends to not notice as they ply her with drink. The Ty-D-Bol blue martini is as much a jab at trendy martinis as it is on the people who market them to women.
Read more

2011     •     36″ x 24″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

Woman’s role in the fall of man has long set the tone for her role in the patriarchal Abrahamic religions. The apple martini being poured by Eve’s good and bad consciences put power, and responsibility, back in Eve’s hands as the snake, the mythical embodiment of the forked tongue trickster who so easily manipulated poor Eve into ruining man’s place in paradise, no longer has a role in anything.
Read more

2010     •     36″ x 24″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

Just a spoon full of liquor helps the medicine go down, and why not treat that bladder infection with some cranberry juice and vodka?
Read more

2010     •     36″ x 24″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

Just a spoon full of liquor helps the medicine go down, and why not prevent that malaria with some quinine tonic water and gin? In India and other tropical regions, malaria was a persistent problem. In the 1700s it was discovered that quinine could be used to treat the disease, although the bitter taste was unpleasant. British officers in India in the early 19th century took to adding a mixture of water, sugar, lime and gin to the quinine in order to make the drink more palatable. The masculine suit, the facial hair, the concern over malaria shared with British imperialist soldiers all hearken to the expectation and hidden dangers of manly pursuits.
Read more

2010     •     22″ x 12″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

Everyone has their own personal religious notions and are able to contort their morals, rationalizing their good and bad actions while harshly judging those of others. It is really about alleviating guilt, lack of empathy and a lack of impulse control. Jesus loves me no matter what but he judges the shit our of your twisted ass.
Read more

2010     •     11″ x 16″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

The fish pattern in the fabric reminded me of Jesus, of course. He send an apostle fishing so that he may pull what he owed in taxes out of a fishes mouth. No word of if the coin turned up heads or tails.
Read more

2009     •     10″ x 8″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

1st in a series of Sacred Heart inspired pieces.
Read more

2009     •     48″ x 48″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

We see here, early in the morning of Ash Wednesday, the aftermath following the Fat Tuesday debauchery. A Christ figure is passed out on the New Orleans riverfront with both the unapologetic party animal and the rationalizing church-goer in similar states of disrepair.

It’s too easy to point out the political motivations behind The Church’s holidays and their pagan roots, so I try to have fun with how little people actually understand their religion. Not hypocrites necessarily but ignorant fools slave to their instincts and animal desires as any heathen, but too self righteous in their so called “faith” to acknowledge it.

Read more

2008     •     48″ x 48″
acrylic, spray paint, paper on panel

The traditional New Orleans “Cities of the Dead” look across to a more modern version, the Katrina houses. Mirrored in the facades are the O’s and X’s with different if not equally mystical meanings.
Read more

2010     •     30″ x 18″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

Half empty, half full, who cares. No one is right. No one is wrong. The taps are dry. Let’s go home.
Read more

2009     •     24″ x 12″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

Deeply layered and textured to evoke time and age, this work deals with the notion of ignoring evidence and coming up with other impossible if not more comforting conclusions.
Read more

2008     •     24″ x 12″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

The discussion of such topics tend not to go well. Here you see me pulling the angel and devil out into a space of their own coming to the same conclusions so many other have had discussing issues of morality.
Read more

Manpower

2009     •     30″ x 12″
acrylic, spray paint, fabric on panel

This piece was born with Moe Profane. During a long creative drought brought on by circumstance, otherwise directed energy and lack of studio space wasn’t without it’s share of good. I spent that time working through ideas and processes strictly theoretically, weighing their conceptual merits and how the process would be as much a part of the idea as the image.

My creative impulse bubbled beneath the surface at varying degrees for years until finally a space to create became available the same time an idea to create an image of uncompromisingly obvious masculinity.

Read more